DISCLAIMER: This website has been prepared for general informational purposes only. The information you see on this website, or by linking to other websites, is not legal advice and cannot replace the advice of an attorney. Viewing this website, completing an online application, or transmitting any e-mail message to SVLAS does not create an attorney-client relationship. In fact, unless you are already a client of SVLAS, your online application or e-mail may NOT be protected by attorney-client privilege. Also please remember that unencrypted e-mail may be intercepted by persons other than the intended recipient. Legal advice is dependent upon the specific circumstances of each situation. If you have a legal problem and want to receive legal advice or representation, you should contact an attorney in your area. If you live in southwestern Virginia, have a low household income, and your problem is one that Legal Aid may be able to assist with, please consider applying for legal assistance from SVLAS.

 Each case is different, but you should apply for services if you can answer YES to each of the following: 
 
YES, apply for services -
if your household has a low income. Depending on your individual circumstances, you may be eligible if your gross family income is below 200% of the federal poverty level.
 
YES, apply for services -
if you live in — or have a legal problem in — one of the following:
Bland, Buchanan, Carroll, Dickenson, Floyd, Giles, Grayson, Lee, Montgomery, Pulaski, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, Wise or Wythe Counties
OR
the Cities of Bristol, Galax, Norton or Radford.
 
YES, apply for services -
if Legal Aid can help you with your type of legal problem.
click here for services provided
Legal Aid does not provide advice or representation about criminal issues and cannot help with a traffic ticket.
 
There are three ways to apply: online, by phone, or direct from your smartphone. Find out how.

AM I ELIGIBLE?

There can be no equal justice where the kind of trial a man gets depends on the amount of money he has.
- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black (1964)